Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) was originated in ancient China and has a history of over two thousand years. Influenced by ancient Chinese philosophy, culture, and science and technology, Chinese medicine uses the theory of Yin and Yang and the theory of Wu Xing to explain the mechanism of balancing the function of the body.

A medical system that has been used for thousands of years to prevent, diagnose, and treat disease. It is based on the belief that Qi (the body’s vital energy) flows along meridians (channels) in the body and keeps a person’s spiritual, emotional, mental, and physical health in balance. Traditional Chinese medicine aims to restore the body’s balance and harmony between the natural opposing forces of yin and yang, which can block Qi and cause disease. Traditional Chinese medicine includes acupuncture, diet, herbal therapy, meditation, physical exercise, and massage. Also called Oriental medicine and TCM. TCM views the human body as an organic whole, and the relationship between the human being and nature as an integral unity. As an organic whole, the various parts of the body are inseparable in structure; the organs are related physiologically and influenced pathologically. This holistic concept includes two aspects: the human body as an organic whole, and the unity between the human body and nature.

Acupuncture involves the insertion of very thin needles through your skin at strategic points on your body. A key component of traditional Chinese medicine, acupuncture is most commonly used to treat pain. Increasingly, it is being used for overall wellness, including stress management.

Traditional Chinese medicine explains acupuncture as a technique for balancing the flow of energy or life force — known as Qi (chee) — believed to flow through pathways (meridians) in your body. By inserting needles into specific points along these meridians, acupuncture practitioners believe that your energy flow will re-balance.

In contrast, many Western practitioners view the acupuncture points as places to stimulate nerves, muscles and connective tissue. Some believe that this stimulation boosts your body’s natural painkillers.

The holistic concept
TCM views the human body as an organic whole, and the relationship between the human being and nature as an integral unity. As an organic whole, the various parts of the body are inseparable in structure; the organs are related physiologically and influenced pathologically. This holistic concept includes two aspects: the human body as an organic whole, and the unity between the human body and nature.

The human body as an organic whole
Taking the five Zang organs as a core, all parts of the body including the six Fu organs, five tissues, five sense organs, four limbs, are related to each other, linked via meridians and collaterals. They complete the body’s functional activities through the actions of Essence, Qi, Blood and Body Fluid.

The unity between the human body and nature
Seasonal and climatic influence on the body: In spring and summer, it is warm and hot, so Yang Qi disperses. The skin of the body is relaxed, the pores are open and there is sweating. The body clears Heat through sweating to regulate the balance of Yin and Yang. In autumn and winter, it is Cold, Yang Qi is stored, the skin of the body remains tight, the pores closed, there is less sweat, but more urine to ensure normal water metabolism, signifying the body’s adaptability to the physiological adjustment.

Day and night influence on the human body: Yang Qi of the body circulates externally during the day and remains in the exterior to promote the functional activities of the Zang Fu organs. In the morning, Yang Qi starts to rise; at noon, Yang Qi becomes flourishing, and at night, Yang Qi tends to be kept inside to let people sleep. This reflects the process of the decrease and increase of Yin and Yang during the day and at night, and the changes to the physiological functional activities.

Geographical influence on the human body: TCM holds that geographical difference, including climatic difference in different regions, living environment, and custom, will affect the physiological activities of the body to a certain degree. When one moves to a new place, one might not be used to the climate and environment at first. However, the body is able to make the relevant adjustment and one gets used to the change after a time.